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Ron Grant, 59, Living With Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (VIDEO)

Ron Grant – Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

28-07-2013 13-44-36Here is an excellent video from a guy called Ron Grant who has been diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease from the Huffington post read and watch

A former prison chaplain, Ron Grant, 60, used to read constantly. “I have several degrees… I had to read books all the time,” Grant told Huff Post Live.

Unfortunately, Grant lost the ability to read five years ago following an Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis. He could no longer keep up with his job as a prison chaplain and had to go on social security to support himself and his family.

Grant is certainly not alone in his struggles. An estimated 5.4 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease and 200,000 Americans have early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, which affects people 65 and under. Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease can strike people as young as 40 years old. Many young people diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s are working professionals, a long way from retirement age.

In the early stages of Alzheimer’s, people can experience a window of time when they are not entirely impaired, yet they are often excluded from regular life prematurely. A growing number of patients at this stage — people like Grant — are speaking out on how it feels to be shut out too soon.

To learn more about living with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, watch the video below.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/23/ron-grant-early-onset-alzheimers-disease_n_3639852.html

How Does Alzheimer’s Disease Develop?

A-patient-at-a-hospital-f-007How Alzheimer’s disease develops?  Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disease that is typified by progressive weakening of cognitive skills, affecting all aspects of day to day activities. A person suffering from Alzheimer’s is likely to undergo severe behavioral changes

Emil Kraepelin was the first person to identify the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Alois Alzheimer, who was a German psychiatrist, studied typical neuropathology for the first time in the year 1906.

 The distinct and the most striking symptom of Alzheimer’s disease is amnesia. In the early stages, a victim of Alzheimer’s is quite often found to be in a confused state, and facing problems with short-term memory. There are usually problems with  paying attention and in terms of spatial orientation.

 The personality of the person affected usually undergoes a massive change coupled with frequent mood swings and the language of the patient may be affected. However, it should be noted that Alzheimer’s disease does not affect everyone in the same way, and this can make the disease quite difficult to diagnose.

In the early stages of the illness, patients tend to lose energy and their alertness of mind decreases but this change is hardly noticeable. Also, there is loss of memory and the person may become moody. Overall, the affected person becomes slow in responding to everyday stimuli. Eventually, due to the significant memory loss the patient tries to shields himself or herself from anything that they find unfamiliar, as a result the person can become highly confused and get lost easily and frequently.

In the next stage, the victim of Alzheimer’s starts seeking assistance to carry out those tasks that require heavy lifting. Their speech starts getting affected and quite frequently they stop abruptly after saying half a sentence. Depression, irritation and restlessness are some of the common traits during this stage of illness.

Slowly, the individual becomes disabled. They may remember past incidents but can’t recall the very recent ones. In the advanced stage it becomes difficult for the patient to distinguish between day and night or even recognize the faces of very near and dear ones.

In the last stage of the disease, patients merely exist. They experience total loss of memory and they are unable to eat properly and cannot control themselves to any great extent. Constant care is needed for a patient at this stage. The individual also becomes prone to other diseases such as pneumonia, infections, etc. Ultimately they become confined to bed and this fatal stage leads to death.

Alzheimer’s disease is not curable but there are treatments available that can slow its progress and there is promising research that may lead to a cure.

Following the experience with our dad and Alzheimer’s disease my brother Chris and I are on a crusade to raise £20,000 to help with Alzheimer’s research and support.  Chris has written and produced and recorded a song and a video of a song called “Worried About My Daddy”. Please, Please, Please go to our website http://worriedaboutmydaddy.com/ to listened to and DOWNLOAD the song or watch the video introduced by not other than Sir Cliff Richard.  If you can afford donate to our worthy cause it would be very much appreciated.

If you are currently facing a situation that a loved one is affected by Alzheimer’s don’t give up you are all they have and even though they may not recognise you a lot of the time there will be times when they do and that is the little ray of light that will keep you going.

The very best of wishes

Dave and Chris Ward

Website: http://worriedaboutmydaddy.com/

 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Worried-About-My-Daddy-Alzheimers/162864977222454?ref=hl

What exactly is Alzheimer’s Disease

Brain rubbing outjpgDave and Chris Ward here we thought we would try to explain a little about what exactly Alzheimer’s disease is.  A disease we had to struggle terribly with over a number of years with our dad.

As uncommon as the name of the disease sounds, its prevalence and incidence rates are not. In fact, 820,000 people in the UK are affected by this problem. This disease does not discriminate and affects men or women, across all social status and economic position in life.

Alzheimer’s is a progressive and degenerative disease under the umbrella of diseases called dementia. There are around 100 different types of dementia however Alzheimer’s is responsible for about 60% to 70% of all dementias.  It is characterized by disorientation and impaired memory. It is caused by an attack in the brain, affecting one’s memory, thinking skills and judgment. Most patients will experience a change in language ability, in the way they use their mental processes and of course their behaviour.

While anybody can be affected by this disease, only it’s primarily those older than age 65 that experience the lagging in their thinking skills and their ability to remember things. Still, there are some who gets Alzheimer’s even when they are just 30 years old but these cases are very rare and only account for a small percentage of the total number of cases. One out of 10 people over the age 65 has Alzheimer’s and nearly half of these patients are over 85 years old. 25 million of the UK population have a close friend or family member with dome form of dementia.

In addition to old age, family history of can also predispose someone to this condition. This is because Alzheimer’s is said to be caused by a problem in the genetic mutations. Still, when you study Alzheimer cases,  it is can also be associated with a host of other factors besides genes. In fact, environmental factors such as hobbies and mental pursuits are things that can help prevent the onset of the problem.

What is difficult with Alzheimer’s is the fact that its symptoms mimic the signs of old age. At the beginning, there will be some memory loss. The person with Alzheimer’s will also experience confusion and disorientation even with things that they are used to doing. The trick is to make sure that one can recognize what normal memory loss is in comparison to memory loss associated with the onset of Alzheimer’s.

Often, there will be a gradual memory loss and difficulty with reading and writing or to thinking clearly.  After which decline in the ability to perform tasks that are already automatic and routine will ensure.  In the terminal stage, the patients may even forget how to brush their teeth or how to use a spoon and fork, something that is almost automatic with people not affected by Alzheimer’s disease.

There will also be difficulty in learning new things and in memorizing things. Some patients may even forget the language that they are speaking with while others will no longer recognize their family. Personality will change in terms of the way they communicate with other people and the way they behave.

There is actually no change in personality per se but because of the problems in their memory, they may appear aloof and suspicious perhaps because they cannot recognize the people that they know before. Some may even become extremely fearful and passive for the simple fact that they cannot remember you. As the disease worsens, the patient will then become so incapable of taking care of themselves that they will require help even in eating and in sleeping.

So that is what Alzheimer’s disease is but its so much more as we found when our dad was diagnosed with it.  It stole his personality and character and until as is said above he did not recognise even the closest of family.  It then slowly debilitates his mental faculties and in the process causes his body to break down.  As we sadly found out Alzheimer’s is a fatal disease which cannot be cured.

Following the experience with our dad and Alzheimer’s disease my brother Chris and I are on a crusade to raise £20,000 to help with Alzheimer’s research and support.  Chris has written and produced and recorded a song and a video of a song called “Worried About My Daddy”. Please, Please, Please go to our website http://worriedaboutmydaddy.com/ to listened to and DOWNLOAD the song or watch the video introduced by not other than Sir Cliff Richard.  If you can afford donate to our worthy cause it would be very much appreciated.

If you are currently facing a situation that a loved one is affected by Alzheimer’s don’t give up you are all they have and even though they may not recognise you a lot of the time there will be times when they do and that is the little ray of light that will keep you going.

What Exactly is Alzheimer’s Disease

As uncommon as the name of the disease sounds, its prevalence and incidence rates are not. In fact, 820,000 people in the UK are affected by this problem. This disease does not discriminate and affects men or women, across all social status and economic position in life.

Alzheimer’s is a progressive and degenerative disease under the umbrella of diseases called dementia. There are around 100 different types of dementia.  It is characterized by disorientation and impaired memory. It is caused by an attack in the brain, affecting one’s memory, thinking skills and judgment. Most patients will experience a change in language ability, in the way they use their mental processes and of course their behaviour. 

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk This film looks at what happens to a brain with Alzheimer’s disease, including the development of amyloid plaques and tau tangle”

While anybody can be affected by this disease, only its primarily those older than age 65 that experience the lagging in their thinking skills and their ability to remember things. Still, there are some who gets Alzheimer’s even when they are just 30 years old but these cases are very rare and only account for a small percentage of the total number of cases. One out of 10 people over the age 65 has Alzheimer’s and nearly half of these patients are over 85 years old. 25 million of the UK population have a close friend or family member with dome form of dementia.

In addition to old age, family history of can also predispose someone to this condition. This is because Alzheimer’s is said to be caused by a problem in the genetic mutations. Still, when you study Alzheimer cases,  it is can also be associated with a host of other factors besides genes. In fact, environmental factors such as hobbies and mental pursuits are things that can help prevent the onset of the problem.

What is difficult with Alzheimer’s is the fact that its symptoms mimic the signs of old age. At the beginning, there will be some memory loss. The person with Alzheimer’s will also experience confusion and disorientation even with things that they are used to doing. The trick is to make sure that one can recognize what normal memory loss is in comparison to memory loss associated with the onset of Alzheimer’s.

Often, there will be a gradual memory loss and difficulty with reading and writing or to thinking clearly.  After which decline in the ability to perform tasks that are already automatic and routine will ensure.  In the terminal stage, the patients may even forget how to brush their teeth or how to use a spoon and fork, something that is almost automatic with people not affected by Alzheimer’s disease.

There will also be difficulty in learning new things and in memorizing things. Some patients may even forget the language that they are speaking with while others will no longer recognize their family. Personality will change in terms of the way they communicate with other people and the way they behave.

There is actually no change in personality per se but because of the problems in their memory, they may appear aloof and suspicious perhaps because they cannot recognize the people that they know before. Some may even become extremely fearful and passive for the simple fact that they cannot remember you. As the disease worsens, the patient will then become so incapable of taking care of themselves that they will require help even in eating and in sleeping.

So that is what Alzheimer’s disease is but its so much more as we found when our dad was diagnosed with it.  It stole his personality and character and until as is said above he did not recognise even the closest of family.  It then slowly debilitates his mental faculties and in the process causes his body to break down.  As we sadly found out Alzheimer’s is a fatal disease which cannot be cured.

 Following the experience with our dad and Alzheimer’s disease my brother Chris and I are on a crusade to raise £20,000 to help with Alzheimer’s research and support.  Chris has written and produced and recorded a song and a video of a song called “Worried About My Daddy”. Please, Please, Please go to our website http://worriedaboutmydaddy.com/ to listened to and DOWNLOAD the song or watch the video introduced by not other than Sir Cliff Richard.  If you can afford donate to our worthy cause it would be very much appreciated.

If you are currently facing a situation that a loved one is affected by Alzheimer’s don’t give up you are all they have and even though they may not recognise you a lot of the time there will be times when they do and that is the little ray of light that will keep you going.

The very best of wishes

Dave and Chris ward
Website: http://worriedaboutmydaddy.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Worried-About-My-Daddy-Alzheimers/162864977222454?ref=hl

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A brief history of Alzheimer’s Disease

Worried about MY daddu - Dr. Alois Alzheimer’sOne could trace back the history of Alzheimer’s disease from a presentation and lecture made by a German psychiatrist in 1906 during 37th Meeting of Southwest German Psychiatrists held in Tübingen.

Dr. Alois Alzheimer presented his findings on a woman who had died after years of having memory problems and confusion.
When Dr. Alzheimer autopsied the patient’s brain, he found thick deposits of neuritic plaques outside and around the nerve cells. He also found a lot of twisted bands of fibers or neurofibrillary tangles inside the nerve cells.

Today, medical specialists need to find the presence of the same plaques and tangles at autopsy in order to have a conclusive diagnosis that Alzheimer’s disease indeed caused the disease. And due to this lecture and achievement in research and studies, the medical community has bestowed the honor of naming the disease after Dr. Alzheimer.

However, Dr. Alzheimer’s work only signaled the start of years of medical research and studies which could only resolve the mysteries of the disease by so much. Up until now, Alzheimer’s disease has still unknown origin and remains to have no cure. At first, the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease was limited for individuals between the ages of 45-65 since the symptoms of pre-senile dementia due to the histopathologic process are more common and prominent during this age.

However, during the 1970s and early 1980s, the term Alzheimer’s disease began to be used to refer to patients of all ages that manifest the same symptoms.

Statistics show that around 350,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease are being diagnosed each year. It is estimated that by 2050, there are 4.5 million Americans afflicted by the disease. Recent studies have shown that there is an increase risk of contracting and developing Alzheimer’s as one grows older.

It has been reported that 5 percent of Americans between the ages of 65 to 74 suffer from Alzheimer’s disease. Also, half of those in the 85 years and older age group are more likely to have the disease.

Genetics have also been seen as a factor in the development of the disease. Scientists have found out that mutations on chromosomes 9 and 19 have been associated with the later stages of Alzheimer’s. However, not everyone that manifests the mutations results to having the disease. Up until now, the relationship between genetics and late-onset Alzheimer’s is still a grey area.

Meanwhile, other research has associated trauma as a factor that increases the risk of acquiring the disease. There are also evidences which suggest that lack of exercise increases the risk factor of Alzheimer’s. It is important to avoid high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and low levels folate in order to decrease the risk of developing the disease.

There are basically three stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Stage 1 or Mild Stage is the early of the disease. At this stage patients become less energetic and will experience slight memory loss. Often times, the symptoms at this stage are either go unnoticed or are ignored as but trivial or normal occurrences.

At Stage 2 or Moderate stage, the patient needs to be assisted in some complicated tasks and memory loss is no highly noticeable. The final stage is the severest stage. Because the disease already progresses too far this point, the patient is unable to perform simple tasks and will lose the ability to walk or eat without help.

We are trying to raise £20,000 for Alzheimer’s research please visit our website at http://worriedaboutmydaddy.com/ to watch our new music video introduced by Sir Cliff Richard about our dads experience with Alzheimer’s.  If you like it you can also download the song for free it for FREE. What have you got to loose??

Brene Brown: The power of vulnerability

 

This video is not Alzheimer's related but it very powerful because it help us to understand our vulnerabilities and how we connect with others.  Its 20 minutes long but well worth watching so switch your phone off, put your feet up, make a cupp and enjoy!!

We are trying to raise £20,000 for the Alzheimer's Society and Alzheimer's research please take a look at our website http://worriedaboutmydaddy.com/ where you can watch the video of our new song Worried About My daddy and download the song for FREE

"http://www.ted.com Brene Brown studies human connection — our ability to empathize, belong, love. In a poignant, funny talk at TEDxHouston, she shares a dee…"

 

Living Alone With Dementia At 92

Living alone with dementia at 92 – Remaining independent with Alzheimer’s disease

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk Rose celebrated her 92nd birthday in February. She has dementia and lives on her own in a flat in the London borough of Tower Hamlets

 

We are trying to raise £20,000 to help fight this cruel and debilitating disease please click here to watch our Music Video “Worried About My Daddy” introduced by none other that Sir Cliff Richard and download it for FREE.

Alzheimer’s disease – is it hereditary (inherited)?

Alzheimer’s disease – is it hereditary (inherited)?

Many people with dementia are concerned that their disease may have been inherited and that they may have passed it on to their children. Family members of people with dementia are also sometimes concerned that they might be more likely to develop dementia themselves.
For further explanation about the genetic factors associated with dementia see the Alsheimer’s Societies Factsheet 405, Genetics and dementia.
You can also read the article Is dementia hereditary? from a past issue of Living with dementia magazine.
Below Dr. Tariot shares if Alzheimer’s disease is hereditary for more on Alzheimer’s disease visit http://www.empowher.com/condition/alzheimers-disease.
We are trying to raise £20,000 to help fight this cruel and debilitating disease please watch our Video above Worried About My Daddy by clicking this link or download the song by clicking this link.  Please also donate by either clicking the button in the top of the left side bar or clicking this link We are trying to raise £20,000 to help fight this cruel and debilitating disease please watch our Video above Worried About My Daddy by clicking this link or download the song by clicking this link.  Please also donate by either clicking the button in the top of the left side bar or clicking this link http://www.justgiving.com/worriedaboutmydaddy. Please help us to achieve our target by making a donation, small or large, whatever you can afford.
Best Wishes
Dave and Chris Ward

The Difference Between Alzheimer’s Disease And Dementia

ALZ DEMentiaI am often asked to explain the difference between Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Dementia. In a nutshell, dementia is a symptom, and Alzheimer’s Disease is the cause. But the question deserves a much more thorough response, and Dr. Robert Stern, Director of Boston University’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center’s Clinical Core (photo, left) provided this response to the question on their website.

(Source: Boston University’s Alzheimers Disease Center and their Alzheimers’ Disease Center’s Bulletin, both of which are great Alzheimer’s Disease resources).

“What is the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia?

“Dementia” is a term that has replaced a more out-of-date word, “senility,” to refer to cognitive changes with advanced age. Dementia includes a group of symptoms, the most prominent of which is memory difficulty with additional problems in at least one other area of cognitive functioning, including language, attention, problem solving, spatial skills, judgment, planning, or organization. These cognitive problems are a noticeable change compared to the person’s cognitive functioning earlier in life and are severe enough to get in the way of normal daily living, such as social and occupational activities.

A good analogy to the term dementia is “fever.” Fever refers to an elevated temperature, indicating that a person is sick. But it does not give any information about what is causing the sickness. In the same way, dementia means that there is something wrong with a person’s brain, but it does not provide any information about what is causing the memory or cognitive difficulties. Dementia is not a disease; it is the clinical presentation or symptoms of a disease.

There are many possible causes of dementia. Some causes are reversible, such as certain thyroid conditions or vitamin deficiencies. If these underlying problems are identified and treated, then the dementia reverses and the person can return to normal functioning.

However, most causes of dementia are not reversible. Rather, they are degenerative diseases of the brain that get worse over time. The most common cause of dementia is AD, accounting for as many as 70-80% of all cases of dementia.

Approximately 5.3 million Americans currently live with AD. As people get older, the prevalence of AD increases, with approximately 50% of people age 85 and older having the disease.

It is important to note, however, that although AD is extremely common in later years of life, it is not part of normal aging. For that matter, dementia is not part of normal aging. If someone has dementia (due to whatever underlying cause), it represents an important problem in need of appropriate diagnosis and treatment by a well-trained healthcare provider who specializes in degenerative diseases.

In a nutshell, dementia is a symptom, and AD is the cause of the symptom.

When someone is told they have dementia, it means that they have significant memory problems as well as other cognitive difficulties, and that these problems are severe enough to get in the way of daily living.

Most of the time, dementia is caused by the specific brain disease, AD. However, some uncommon degenerative causes of dementia include vascular dementia (also referred to as multi-infarct dementia), frontotemporal dementia, Lewy Body disease, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

Contrary to what some people may think, dementia is not a less severe problem, with AD being a more severe problem. There is not a continuum with dementia on one side and AD at the extreme. Rather, there can be early or mild stages of AD, which then progress to moderate and severe stages of the disease.

One reason for the confusion about dementia and AD is that it is not possible to diagnose AD with 100% accuracy while someone is alive. Rather, AD can only truly be diagnosed after death, upon autopsy when the brain tissue is carefully examined by a specialized doctor referred to as a neuropathologist.

During life, a patient can be diagnosed with “probable AD.” This term is used by doctors and researchers to indicate that, based on the person’s symptoms, the course of the symptoms, and the results of various tests, it is very likely that the person will show pathological features of AD when the brain tissue is examined following death.

In specialty memory clinics and research programs, such as the BU ADC, the accuracy of a probable AD diagnosis can be excellent. And with the results of exciting new research, such as that being conducted at the BU ADC, the accuracy of AD diagnosis during life is getting better and better.”

Nancy Strickman Stein, who holds a Masters in Public Health from Yale University; a PhD in Epidemiology and Public Health from the University of Miami; and more than 25 years of experience as an active health care professional and advocate in south Florida. It was her own experience and lessons learned as a caregiver for her parents that motivated her to make the care-giving journey easier for others. Seniority Matters is South Florida’s most respected resource for family caregivers.

Thanks for reading this post by Nancy Stien, we are trying to raise £20,000 to help fight this cruel and debilitating disease please watch our Video above Worried About My Daddy The best song your ever likely to hear about Alzheimer’s by clicking this link or download the song by clicking this link.  Please also donate by either clicking the button in the top of the left side bar or clicking this link http://www.justgiving.com/worriedaboutmydaddy. Please help us to achieve our target by making a donation, small or large, whatever you can afford.
http://senioritymatters.com

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